Portland’s painted lady gets a facelift

By this spring, Fletcher Curran's painted lady had been defaced by some rather unimaginative scrawling.

By this spring, Fletcher Curran’s painted lady had been defaced by some rather unimaginative scrawling.

Last fall, the owners of a boarded-up storefront on Congress Street, near its intersection with High Street, asked painter Fletcher Curran to beautify their patch of plywood. He painted a ravishing, pale woman with technicolor tresses flowing past her purple shift.

It was a 100% percent improvement over the plain particle board and a a far cry from the mentally-stunted habit of many street “artists” who thoughtlessly scribble their tag all over my city. I’m talking to you “BRO.”

But, as sometimes happens in a city where doofuses have access to pigments, Curran’s lady became the target of vandals. They defaced her, literally.

Today, while riding my motorcycle up Congress Street in the sun, I spotted Curran, his scooter parked close by. He was giving his creation her old face back. She’s once again a sight to see and a welcome splash of color amongst the 19th century facades.

But you’d better hurry. There’s no telling when the spray-can wilding morons will arrive again, making her face resemble the wall in a truck stop mens room.

Till then, lady, shine on.

Fletcher Curran touches-up his painted lady today.

Fletcher Curran touches-up his painted lady today.

Recommend this article
Troy R. Bennett

About Troy R. Bennett

Troy R. Bennett is a Buxton native and longtime Portland resident whose photojournalism has appeared in media outlets all over the world.